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Tag: BLM Public Land

Stornetta Public Lands

Stornetta Public Lands

The 1,132 acre Stornetta Public Lands are located along the Mendocino County coastline just north of the town of Point Arena. containing significant natural resources, including important wildlife habitat, several riparian corridors, extensive wetlands, ponds and other water sources, cypress groves, meadows and sand dunes. Migratory waterfowl, shore birds, raptors, and several special status species are seen here. The Garcia River is prime Coho and Chinook salmon habitat, and is a key recovery area in recent Endangered Species Act listings….

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South Spit Cooperative Management Area

South Spit Cooperative Management Area

The South Spit is a 4.5-mile expanse of wave sculped beaches, windswept dunes, and bayshore marshes. A mix of several habitat types attracts a diversity of birds including migrant waterfowl, snowy plover and sanderlings, cormorants, pelicans, and black turnstones to name a few. Location is a 20 minute scenic drive from either Eureka or Fortuna in Humboldt County. The area is jointly managed by the BLM, California Department of Fish and Game, and the County of Humboldt. Many additional cooperators,…

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Samoa Dunes Recreation Area

Samoa Dunes Recreation Area

The Samoa Dunes Recreation Area is a 300-acre park managed by the Bureau of Land Management and is available to the public for a variety of recreational activities. The park is known for the distinct dune formation process that can be seen in the landscape from the coast to the wetlands. A variety coastal wildlife live in the park, including the endangered Humboldt Bay wallflower. The site of the park was once a food gathering location of the Wiyot Indians,…

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Ma-le’l Dunes Cooperative Management Area

Ma-le’l Dunes Cooperative Management Area

Ma-le’l Dunes consists of 444 acres and is managed cooperatively by the BLM and the Humboldt Bay National Wildlife Refuge. The area is located on the Samoa Peninsula, just north of Manila. The diversity in landforms supports a unique combination of coastal dune, wetland, and estuarine ecosystems. This diversity provides a haven for a rich variety of plants and animals. Eleven different plant habitats are found within this relatively small area. Two federally listed endangered plants make their home in…

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King Range and the Lost Coast

King Range and the Lost Coast

At 4,087 feet above the Pacific, King Peak is the highest point on the U.S. continental coastline (excluding Alaska). Administered by the BLM (Bureau of Land Management) King Range National Conservation Area became an addition to the U.S. Wilderness System in 2006. It covers 60,000 acres, with over 42,000 in wilderness areas and extends along 35 miles of northern California coastline. Humboldt Wild photography book by Arleen Olson highlights the beauty of the King Range and the Lost Coast along…

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King Range National Conservation Area ~ Hiking Trails

King Range National Conservation Area ~ Hiking Trails

There are over 100 miles of trails in the King Range, with opportunities from 4,000 foot high coastal mountain top trails, rugged beach hikes along the Lost Coast Trail, and challenging mountain biking on the Paradise Royale Trail. From multi-day camping to short interpretive day hikes, the King Range offers a spectrum of unforgettable experiences. The King Range’s Lost Coast Trail is a 34 mile segment of the larger California Coastal Trail, under construction to create a coastal hiking opportunity…

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King Range National Conservation Area ~ Mountain Biking

King Range National Conservation Area ~ Mountain Biking

The Paradise Royale Mountain Bike Trail is a 14 mile loop trail dedicated with a celebration on National Public Lands Day, September 27, 2008 to recognize all the groups and individuals who contributed 4,000 volunteer hours to build the 14-mile loop trail. The 14 mile loop opened to rave reviews from riders across the US, and a feature article in the March 2009 issue of “Bike” magazine. It is beautiful single track built for mountain biking. This was designed for…

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Indian Valley / Walker Ridge

Indian Valley / Walker Ridge

Rolling chaparral covered hills dotted with oak and pine make an ideal setting for hunting, camping, bicycling, hiking, and equestrian use. Popular game animals include blacktail deer, black bear, quail, dove, and wild turkey. For wildflower enthusiasts, pockets of the rare Indian Valley Brodiaea and Adobe Lily can be found within the area. The Indian Valley/Walker Ridge Recreation Area area is north of Highway 20, on the eastern edge of Lake County. Recreational Opportunities For additional information on recreational opportunities,…

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Headwaters Forest Reserve

Headwaters Forest Reserve

Located approximately 5 miles inland from Humboldt Bay near Eureka, California, Headwaters Forest Reserve was established in 1999 to preserve the last unprotected large stand of old-growth redwood forest. Unique ecological values of the forest include • a highly intact, functioning old-growth forest ecosystem that has very large redwood and Douglas –fir trees, • a high diversity of plant species in the forest understory, • nesting of threatened marbled murrelets and northern spotted owls, and • undisturbed headwater stream habitat…

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Cow Mountain Recreation Area

Cow Mountain Recreation Area

Named for the longhorn cattle that once roamed wild, the 52,000-acre Cow Mountain Recreation Area offers a variety of recreational opportunities. The terrain is rugged, consisting mostly of steep, chaparral-covered slopes with scattered stands of fir, pine and oak. Elevations range from 800 to 4,000 feet. The area offers beautiful views of Ukiah and Clear Lake, over 31 miles of stream, 13 wildlife reservoirs, and habitat for blacktail deer, bear, wild turkey, and other upland species. The Recreation Area is…

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